This full-day closed workshop will take place as part of the TILTing Perspectives conference, on May 17th. The purpose of the workshop is to scope the state of the art in web tracking research in order to understand what findings from existing studies in the technical/computer science domain can tell us about the political economy of the data market.

Participants will include scholars and practitioners working on web tracking research, tool development, privacy advocacy, and social scientific, economic or legal studies of online tracking. The main aim of the session is to scope the state of the art and to formulate a future research agenda informed by political economy concerns. The workshop will give participants an opportunity to learn about wider perspectives in web tracking studies, and provide an introduction to analytical tools and techniques often used in the study of online tracking.

  • 09:00-10:30 Room DZ7 - Keynote remarks by Joris van Hoboken, Professor of Law at the Vrije Universiteit Brussels and co-author of Data Brokers in an Open Society, and Frederike Kaltheuner, Corporate Exploitation Programme Lead at Privacy International
  • 10:30-11:00 Coffee break
  • 11:00-11:45 Room DZ7 - Unconference session: What do we want to know?
  • 11:45-13:15 Room DZ7 - Methods session with presentations by Martin Degeling, Researcher at Ruhr-University Bochum, Wolfie Christl, and Princiya Sequeira
  • 13:15-14:15 Lunch
  • 14:15-15:00 Room DZ2 - Keynote on ‘Justice and the Data Market’ by Seda Gürses, Assistant Professor at TU Delft
  • 15:00-16:30 Room DZ7 - Political economy session with presentations by Rasmus Helles, Assistant Professor at the University of Copenhagen, Viktoria Robertson, Assistant Professor at the Institute of Corporate and International Commercial Law, University of Graz, and Frederik Borgesius, Professor of Law, at Radboud University
  • 16:30-17:00 Room DZ7 - Wrapping up

Key Resources:

  • Englehardt, S. and A. Narayanan (2016) Online Tracking: A 1-million-site Measurement and Analysis. 2016 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security, Vienna, Austria. Available at: https://webtransparency.cs.princeton.edu/webcensus/
  • Ezrachi, A. and V. Robertson (2018) Competition, Market Power and Third-Party Tracking. Forthcoming, World Competition: Law and Economics Review 42(1). Available at: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3272552
  • Falahrastegar, M., Haddadi, H., Uhlig, S. and Mortier, R. (2014) Anatomy of the Third-Party Web Tracking Ecosystem. Available at: http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.1066
  • Falahrastegar, M., Haddadi, H., Uhlig, S. and Mortier, R. (2016) Tracking Personal Identifiers Across the Web. 17th International Conference on Passive and Active Measurement, PAM 2016, Heraklion, Greece. Available at: http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30505-9_3
  • Lerner, A., A. K. Simpson, T. Kohno, and F. Roesner (2016) Internet Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Trackers: An Archaeological Study of Web Tracking from 1996 to 2016. 25th USENIX Security Symposium, 2016, Austin, USA. Available at: https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity16/technical-sessions/presentation/lerner
  • Libert, T. (2015) Exposing the Hidden Web: An Analysis of Third-Party HTTP Requests on One Million Websites. International Journal of Communication 9, p. 3544–3561. Available at: https://arxiv.org/abs/1511.00619v1
  • Mayer, J. R., and J.C. Mitchell (2012) Third-Party Web Tracking: Policy and Technology. 2012 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, San Francisco, USA. Available at: https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6234427/